"

I often think artists and people who write about art place way too
much importance on the appearance of novelty and obtuse sound bites, but if they really did their homework they’d see relationships and historical precedents all over the place. Arbus and Lisette Model, Robert Frank and Walker Evans, etc. are obvious examples. No one works in a vacuum; there is precedent and dialogue in every medium and expression and those relationships can be really interesting. (“Tradition and the Individual Talent” by T.S. Eliot should be required reading). The uniqueness or particularity of serious work is often in more thoughtful, quieter differences – all of which have to do with our own biography, experiences, and the world that we’re faced with at any given time.


I could give you a very long list of artists whose work I admire, and an even longer list of writers and film makers that have influenced my work. But I really like what Robert Gober said: “Whenever I give a talk about my work I am invariably asked who my influences are. Not what my influences are, but who.. As if the gutter, misunderstandings, memories, sex, dreams, and books matter less than forebears do. After all, in terms of influences, it is as much the guy who mugged me on Tenth Street, or my beloved dog who passed away much too early, as it was Giotto or Diane Arbus.”

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from Boulevard: and interview with Katy Grannan. See more of the work from Boulevard and an essay on it here.  (via greatleapsideways)

(via typeandface)

weissesrauschen:

gianfranco piazzini

weissesrauschen:

gianfranco piazzini

(via typeandface)

caseyjameswilson:

6 6-PACKS

caseyjameswilson:

6 6-PACKS

(via typeandface)

widerangeofnormal:


He was a guy who talked with commas, like a heavy novel. | Raymond Chandler

likeafieldmouse:

Christopher Wool

(Source: againbeholdthestars, via utopiarchive)

(Source: weissesrauschen, via theboywiththebeautifulhair)

bookpatrol:

Romano Carrattieri

bookpatrol:

Romano Carrattieri

(via bookporn)

livelymorgue:

April 24, 1948: The freighter Charles Tufts, which crashed on the shores of Sea Gate, Brooklyn, made an addition to the spectacles available to Coney Island sightseers. The Charles Tufts was a Liberty ship, one of the fleet of cargo vessels built during World War II, and the man it was named for donated the land in Medford, Mass., that would eventually become Tufts University. It took 12 hours and five tugboats to free the boat. Photo: The New York Times

(via distinguishedcompany)

art-kast:

Isabel Cuenca 

blushingcheekymonkey:

nendo - thin black lines 

(via notational)

bobbycaputo:

Hasselblad Moon Camera Sale Soars Sky High Despite Questions About History

A camera claimed to have been used on the moon’s surface sold for almost $1 million in Austria Saturday (March 22), despite concerns about its history.

The WestLicht Photographica Auction in Vienna registered a hammer price of 550,000 euros (660,000 euros with the buyer’s premium, or about $910,400 US) for a Hasselblad Electronic Data Camera (EDC) that the gallery described as having been used by astronaut James Irwin during the Apollo 15 mission.

“This Hasselblad used on the fourth NASA [moon landing] mission between July 26th to August 7th, 1971 made its way back to Earth, finally landing at the WestLicht auction house,” the sale’s organizers wrote.

The camera’s lot opened for sale at 80,000 euros (about $110,000) and the final sale price far surpassed the 150,000 to 200,000 euros (about $200,000 to $275,000) that WestLicht had estimated the lunar Hasselblad to be worth.

Most of the cameras that the Apollo astronauts used on the lunar surface were left there to reduce the weight of the moon-rock-laden returning spacecraft. Evidence exists however, for at least four of the Hasselblads to have been brought back to Earth, including Irwin’s, which had locked up during the mission and was returned for analysis.

(Continue Reading)

lintrolled:

Luke Burke - Distortion

lintrolled:

Luke Burke - Distortion

nicholasjannelli:

'Tape and Grid  (filled  variation #6 /3-23-14’

nicholasjannelli:

'Tape and Grid  (filled  variation #6 /3-23-14’

(via mueet)

les-sources-du-nil:

David Lynch
"Interior #11" from 'Small Stories'
(Courtesy Galerie Item)

les-sources-du-nil:

David Lynch

"Interior #11" from 'Small Stories'

(Courtesy Galerie Item)

(Source: cherrydmdm.wordpress.com, via yesihaveathousandtongues)